Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly bookish meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. It’s a fun way to get to know fellow bloggers while simultaneously enjoying the fun of a list! And what’s more, a list about BOOKS! What could be better?

July 3rd: Top Ten Books I’d Recommend If You Enjoy the Work of Tamora Pierce

JUST IN CASE I have not flailed like a madwoman ENOUGH on this blog and on various Top Ten Tuesday posts about what a huge Tamora Pierce fan I am… I present a list of authors that remind me of her work! And if you haven’t given Pierce’s work a shot yet and you like the authors on this list… well you know what to do.

1) Graceling by Kristin Cashore (review)

Why? 

Kristin Cashore’s Katsa reminds me a bit of Alanna, Pierce’s first heroine. Though they don’t have a lot in common on the surface, they’re both extremely strong heroines, who make their living through combat. And if you want a surface comparison… they both have unusually colored eyes ;)

2) Fire by Kristin Cashore (review)

Why?

Why yes, this is a second Kristin Cashore novel on this list (guess what comes next). But the world-building element in Fire is really interesting to me. It’s set in the same world as Graceling, but in an earlier time (though different lands). That element reminds me of Pierce’s Tortall, which we are introduced to through her Lioness series, but her most recent Beka Cooper series puts us in the same world… only many generations before Alanna ever existed. Plus we stick with the strong female characters.

3) Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore (review)

Why?

Let’s put it this way: I very nearly made this list called “If you like Kristin Cashore, try…” until I realized that I could literally make the entire list consist of Tamora Pierce’s novels. High fantasy, political drama-rama, and strong woman. Yeah.

4) The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson (review)

Why?

Elisa’s character growth is SO amazing. I have got a big girl crush on that girl’s character arc. Plus the world is amazing and Spanish Morocco-inspired. And the exploration of the religion Carson created. GAH. Incredible.

5) Grave Mercy by R.L. LaFevers (review)

Why?

This is more of a historic fantasy rather than high. It draws on an actual historic conflict in addition to adding a paranormal twist. Plus: ASSASSIN NUNS. Marvillosa.

6) Touch of Power by Maria V. Snyder (review)

Why?

Healing. Persecution. Fantasy. Loveable supporting characters. Love/hate relationship. Warring criz-azy royals. Need I say more?

7) Shadow & Bone by Leigh Bardugo (review)

Why?

The world that Leigh Bardugo built is SO unique. Fantasy lovers rejoice!

8) Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Why?

Celaena is kick-ass from the GET-GO. There’s an evil king, and just a smidge of magic. Also pretty much the first love triangle I’ve ever read that has actually ever worked for me.

9) Cinder by Marissa Meyer (review)

Why?

Unlike other books on this list, Cinder is not a fantasy novel. It’s science-fiction. But it features some typical fantasy features such as royalty, magic, and like the majority of Pierce’s novels (and pretty much every book on this list), it revolves around a strong female character.

10) A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin (review)

Why?

I started reading Tamora Pierce when I was a wee one… also known as a teenager. Game of Thrones brings you high fantasy on a more ADULT level. And there’s the added bonus of an awesome HBO series that stays pretty faithful to the books!